Who Was The First Explorer To Find Sea Route From Europe To Asia?

Who found a sea route from Europe to Asia?

The first recorded completion of the route was made in 1498 by Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama, the admiral of the first Portuguese Armadas bound eastwards to make the discovery. The route was important during the Age of Sail, but became partly obsolete as the Suez Canal opened in 1869.

Which country was the first to find a sea route to Asia?

The Portuguese goal of finding a sea route to Asia was finally achieved in a ground-breaking voyage commanded by Vasco da Gama, who reached Calicut in western India in 1498, becoming the first European to reach India.

Which is the busiest sea route in the world?

The English Channel (between the UK and France) The busiest sea route in the world, it connects the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. More than 500 ships pass through this channel daily.

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Why did Europe need to find a sea route to Asia?

Why did European nations seek a sea route to Asia? They wanted to bypass the existing trading routes controlled by foreign powers and gain direct access to the spices and other goods of Asia. He found previously unknown continents and expanded Spain’s trading and exploration rights.

When did Europe and Asia meet?

Anaximander placed the boundary between Asia and Europe along the Phasis River the modern Rioni in Georgia in the Caucasus Mountains from Rioni mouth in Poti on the Black Sea coast, through the Surami Pass and along the Kura River to the Caspian Sea, a convention still followed by Herodotus in the 5th century BC.

Who found the sea route to India?

Vasco da Gama’s name has figured in all history books, whether they relate to World, European,1 Asian or Indian history,2 as a great sailor and adventurer. He has been solely credited with the honour of having discovered the sea-route from Europe to India via the Cape of Good Hope.

Who first made a route across Asia to China?

The original Silk Route was established during the Han Dynasty by Zhang Quian, a Chinese official and diplomat. During a diplomatic mission, Quian was captured and detained for 13 years on his first expedition before escaping and pursuing other routes from China to Central Asia.

Which ocean has the most traffic?

In the Indian Ocean, where the world’s busiest shipping lanes are located, ship traffic grew by more than 300 percent over the 20-year period, according to the research.

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Which is the busiest sea route of the Europe?

The Strait of Dover, which is considered to be the busiest maritime route in the world, has been a mainstay of the European shipping network for several years now.

What is the busiest stretch of water in the world?

The English Channel, also called simply the Channel (French: la Manche), is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that separates Southern England from northern France and links to the southern part of the North Sea by the Strait of Dover at its northeastern end. It is the busiest shipping area in the world.

What initially prevented European explorers from finding a sea route to Asia?

Terms in this set (23) Europeans didn’t have accurate maps of the world to reach Asia and also lacked technology. What obstacles prevented Europeans from sailing to Asia? The aim of this school was to improve ships, maps, and navigational technology.

Who found a sea route to Asia?

The first European explorer to reach Asia by sea was Vasco da Gama, a Portuguese captain who arrived on the coast of India in 1498, six years after Christopher Columbus believed he had landed in Asia.

Why did Europe desperately want to find a sea route to India?

Europeans were interested in finding a new route to Asia. The Europeans had a great deal of interest in trading with countries in Asia. There were many products that the Asians had that were in demand in Europe, especially spices. Christopher Columbus also wanted to find a new route to Asia.